MyrmEcoDex

Introduction

To study tropical biodiversity it isn’t necessary to travel far. A long account of field surveys, expeditions and research resulted in extensive natural history collections worldwide. A lot of these samples were collected a long time ago and information is not readily accessible. Often, deposited specimens were never examined and many of these collections house species new to science. As part of BINCO’s mission to study biodiversity and make data available, we collaborate with museums and institutes to help fill this gap. A compartmentalized approach is taken where small and well identified blocks of the collection are studied, specimens digitized and data made available in databases. The subject of study is decided in collaboration with the institutes and is often in support of ongoing research and field work. Over the years BINCO developed a cheap and reliable approach to rapidly make this information available. 

These projects are only possible due to the dedication and enthusiasm of our volunteers. Are you interested in working with us on our digitization project? Don’t hesitate to send a message to the project coordinators.

To study tropical biodiversity it isn’t necessary to travel far. A long account of field surveys, expeditions and research resulted in extensive natural history collections worldwide. A lot of these samples were collected a long time ago and information is not readily accessible. Often, deposited specimens were never examined and many of these collections house species new to science. As part of BINCO’s mission to study biodiversity and make data available, we collaborate with museums and institutes to help fill this gap. A compartmentalized approach is taken where small and well identified blocks of the collection are studied, specimens digitized and data made available in databases.


About us

Frederik De Wint recently graduated as biodiversity, conservation and restoration biologist. He coordinates a project on diversity of ants from Honduras, carried out by MyrmEcoDex (the BINCO ant workgroup). Focusing on entomology, his main interests cover tropical biodiversity as well as social insects and arthropods that live in their nests. For his masterthesis, he studied the association between the Common rough woodlouse and Red wood ants.  

Frederik De Wint recently graduated as biodiversity, conservation and restoration biologist. He coordinates a project on diversity of ants from Honduras, carried out by MyrmEcoDex (the BINCO ant workgroup). Focusing on entomology, his main interests cover tropical biodiversity as well as social insects and arthropods that live in their nests. For his masterthesis, he studied the association between the Common rough woodlouse and Red wood ants.  

Frederik De Wint recently graduated as biodiversity, conservation and restoration biologist. He coordinates a project on diversity of ants from Honduras, carried out by MyrmEcoDex (the BINCO ant workgroup). Focusing on entomology, his main interests cover tropical biodiversity as well as social insects and arthropods that live in their nests. For his masterthesis, he studied the association between the Common rough woodlouse and Red wood ants.  

Frederik De Wint recently graduated as biodiversity, conservation and restoration biologist. He coordinates a project on diversity of ants from Honduras, carried out by MyrmEcoDex (the BINCO ant workgroup). Focusing on entomology, his main interests cover tropical biodiversity as well as social insects and arthropods that live in their nests. For his masterthesis, he studied the association between the Common rough woodlouse and Red wood ants.  


Current project: Ants of Cusuco National Park

 Cusuco National Park (CNP)   2018–…   Frederik De Wint, Matt Hamer, Dominik Oorts

Ants occupy a variety of habitats throughout CNP and so multiple collecting methods will be needed to sample their biodiversity effectively. A significant number of species occupy the leaf-litter layer between the soil and vegetation – this diversity has previously been explored by the LLAMA project in 2010 (Longino et al., 2014). However, further surveys in areas not sampled by the LLAMA project may reveal new records and potentially new species. Additionally, it will be interesting to document whether ants found during the LLAMA project are recovered during current survey work. Ants also reside above ground where particular species dominate over others; it can be easy to overlook more subtle and secretive species, therefore methods such as bait-trapping together with more extensive pitfall trapping could be used to broaden our knowledge on ant diversity.


Collaborators

Wouter Dekoninck – Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences (RBINS)

Contact us

For general questions regarding the MyrmEcoDex work group, send us an email.

Join us

We are looking for helping hands. Find more information in the document…

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